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10 months ago

Six ways AI will make your life better

The last few years have seen huge advancements in the world of artificial intelligence. As the technology continues to improve, we’ll see more and more real world applications of artificial intelligence. That means artificial intelligence is going to start playing a more obvious role in our lives. Here are six ways that AI will be making our lives better in the coming years.


Your personal concierge

Already our smartphones come equipped with personal assistants that can follow basic commands and do certain tasks for us. But in the next few years, you can expect to see huge advancements in what these personal assistants are able to do. They will be able to do more than just follow simple commands. They will be able to make recommendations based on our preferences and even help us with decision making.


Crisis management

One major advantage to artificial intelligence is that it’s able to process vast amounts of data very quickly. During a crisis, this will be crucial as artificial intelligence can help us in sorting through incoming data and devising the best plan to deal with the disaster as it unfolds.


Search and rescue

Something relatively new in the world of artificial intelligence is the ability for artificial intelligence systems to work together to solve problems or perform tasks. Already there is a RoboCup World Championship where robots have to learn to work together in order to win. This ability for robots to work together can allow them to assist us with situational problems like search and rescue that require collaboration.


Public health

Public health is a major concern. At any time, there could be a major outbreak of a deadly illness. Health professionals are always on the lookout for these kinds of outbreaks by watching for patterns of symptoms. But artificial intelligence will be able to sort through medical data and identify worrying patterns much sooner than people alerting us to public health concerns before an outbreak.


Driverless cars

Not too long ago, the idea of a driverless car would have seemed like science fiction. Today they’re already a reality with numerous companies perfecting the technology. In the near future, you can expect to see driverless cars become available to the public. These cars will allow us to make more efficient use of our time since we will be able to focus on other tasks while our cars drive for us. They’ll also be a lot safer resulting in fewer accidents and traffic fatalities.


No terminator robots

One thing we don’t have to worry about, at least in the near future, is a robot uprising. We’re still a long ways off from creating artificial intelligence that can replicate the way the human brain works. At leastfor the time being, artificial intelligence will be completely at the mercy of human programming which means they can’t harm us, unless we program them to.


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1 year ago

Humor: Artificial intelligence’s greatest obstacle

It’s been said that the true test of mastering a foreign language is the ability to make a joke in that language. While a sense of humor is usually second nature for most native speakers, it’s surprisingly difficult—if not impossible—to teach. It’s so difficult, in fact, that some reason that the development of a sense of humor will be the ultimate test for artificial intelligence. To understand the difficulty in teaching artificial intelligence to be humorous, consider what goes into making a joke.


What’s in a joke?

On a recent trip to Australia, comedy writer, David Misch observed two manta rays engaged in—shall we say—extracurricular activities. With perfect comedic timing, he quipped “Hey! It’s fifty shades of ray!” The joke led his friend, a former computer programmer interested in artificial intelligence, to think about whether a computer could ever be programmed to make that joke—not merely be programmed to repeat it, but truly generate it were it exposed to the same circumstances that David Misch was.

In the end, it was determined that in order for an artificially intelligent computer to make that joke, it would need to be able to perform numerous, instant calculations. It would need to be able to connect the two very different topics of manta ray intercourse and human S and M, then it would need to be able to access the entirety of pop culture references to human S and M ultimately settling on Fifty Shades of Grey. Then it would need the ability to appreciate the pun, understand the rhyme of “ray” and “grey,” and gauge the audience’s ability to get the joke. Finally, artificial intelligence would need to do all of this in a blink of an eye to achieve good comedic timing (the joke wouldn’t have been funny five minutes later).

The moral of this story is that a lot goes into the making of a good joke and artificial intelligence is still far away from being able to replicate it.


Funny AI

Though artificial intelligence is still a long way away from developing a sense of humor, that hasn’t stopped humans from trying. Apple executives, for instance, were not overly thrilled to learn that those who programmed Siri, the iPhone’s built-in personal assistant, had managed to work in a few jokes. Microsoft’s counterpart, Cortana, is likewise programmed to give humorous responses to certain questions. Of course the major difference is that these artificial intelligences are merely parroting back jokes that they were programmed to say in response to specific questions, not generating their own humor.


The ultimate test

Some have theorized that in order for AI to reach its full potential, humans will need to feel comfortable interacting with it. Developing a sense of humor will certainly need to be a part of that process. Of course, that’s easier said than done. For the time being, we’ll have to be content with Siri’s dry sense of humor that she inherited from computer programmers.

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1 year ago

What Hollywood gets right (and wrong) about artificial intelligence

Since the concept of artificial intelligence was first dreamed of, Hollywood has made a tremendous amount of money portraying it in film. Movie-goers are naturally interested in artificial intelligence and like to imagine the worst possible outcomes that could result as artificial intelligence becomes a more common part of our daily life. Of course, Hollywood has been known to get a few things wrong when it comes to portraying scientific technologies on the big screen. What is really surprising is they actually get a few things right. Here’s a look at what Hollywood gets right and wrong about artificial intelligence.


Mind uploading

One of the most common tropes in artificial intelligence fiction is the concept of mind uploading, or digital immortality. The idea behind mind uploading is that humans can artificially become immortal by uploading human consciousness into a machine or robot of some kind. The most recent Hollywood film to make use of this trope was Chappie. Though the concept has enjoyed a lot of popularity in Hollywood films, Artificial Intelligence experts say that it’s also one of the most inaccurate. Currently, science is nowhere near being able to upload human consciousness into a machine. Though a few theorize it could possibly happen far in the future, the majority in the scientific community believe it’s nothing but science fiction.


Changes in agenda

One of Asimov’s three laws of robotics states that “A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm.” But there is no shortage of movies that involve robots governed by artificial intelligence choosing to implement the Zeroth Law in which they diverge from their programmed agenda to achieve what they perceive as a greater good. In I Robot, for instance, the robots stage a revolution against the humans. According to the scientific community, movies like Steven Spielberg’s AI are more accurate because artificial intelligence cannot stray from its programmed instructions.


Robot feelings

Another favorite trope in artificial intelligence fiction is the robot that develops human emotions. Of all of the artificial intelligence myths, this one is probably the most subjective. According to experts in artificial intelligence, there is really no science to prove or disprove the possibility of robots developing human emotions. The question largely depends on how we define human emotion. Some theorize that emotions are nothing more than the result of electrical and chemical reactions in the brain. In that sense, it could in theory be recreated in a robot though that science is probably decades away.

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Source: outerplaces .com/science/item/9373-from-2001-a-space-odyssey-to-chappie-ai-experts-on-which-movies-get-it-right